copyleft

Public domain and World Wide Web

Quick follow-up of my post on the creation of a non-free public domain.

20 years ago today, the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) released the World Wide Web in the public domain. What better example than that to illustrate the importance of the public domain in our everyday lives?

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Source: Twenty years of a free, open web

Photo: copyleft, by Alex via Flickr (CC BY)

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San Francisco Oil Spill - Closed Beaches

In France, we don’t have oil, but we sure have bad ideas

Like in many other countries in the world, the French government and lobbies have no respect for free stuff. One of the most obvious examples is their war against piracy (not real-life-ARRGHH piracy, but movies-and-games-torrent-downloading piracy), which may have some logical points (which I don’t agree with, but that’s a different issue).

In France, one of the latest brilliant ideas of the Adami, a French copyright collective, is that there shouldn’t be a public domain. Or at least, not a free one.

The current idea of the public domain is that, after a specific time (which, today, is a really long and indecent time), a work (book, song, movie,…) becomes available for everybody to get, use, modify,… for free. The existence of the public domain has always been a way for the public to gain access to more knowledge, as well as for the creation of new work to thrive.

But the Adami has another idea: creating a public domain that you pay for. It would be managed by yet another copyright collective (which doesn’t make any sense since the public domain means the absence of copyright), and this collective would then remunerate the authors, or their descendants, when their work would be used. And this, for ever. And I guess that at some point, it would become too difficult to find actual descendants, and where would the money go? You’re right, probably to the copyright collective itself. I’m not saying that these people are greedy bastards, but the whole idea feels wrong. The copyright is already too long, there is no need to prolong it indefinitely.

Photo: San Francisco Oil Spill – Closed Beaches, by Ingrid Taylar via Flickr (CC BY)

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FCC Open Meeting - Broadband Plan

Will Net Neutrality die in the US?

Yesterday, on BoingBoing: FCC planning new Internet rules that will gut Net Neutrality. Get ready to pay more for the stuff you love online..

The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) will propose, today, that ISPs should be able to offer “special access to consumers” for specific services. This means that consumers will have to pay extras to be able to receive a good quality of service. This would currently only concern US consumers, but since the whole world seems to follow the US decisions, and the Net Neutrality is already in danger in Europe, even after the recent vote in the European Parliament (the French government doesn’t seem to want to follow the result of this vote: Neutralité du net : la France plaide pour les services spécialisés).

As a non-US citizen, there is nothing I can do about it, but I sure hope that this won’t happen.

Photo: FCC Open Meeting – Broadband Plan, by Greg Elin via Flickr (CC BY-SA)

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Customer

Good customer relation – Snipt

Some time ago, I signed up on Snipt, a website that allows you to store snippets. It was a free account, that I probably used once, to test the service (only because this was not something I needed).

But yesterday I received an email from them, announcing that they will move away from free accounts. This is a fair enough decision, I can understand the need for a stable income.

Lots of services start with free accounts, and then cancel them (see my recent post on DynDNS). But the email I received from Snipt was written to keep good relations with all users, the ones that will upgrade to a paying account, and the ones that don’t have the need or the will to do it:

I’m an existing user. What happens to my data?

Nothing. As an existing user, your snipts will remain intact and usable even if you decide not to upgrade. You can edit your existing snipts, delete, embed, etc. If you would like to create new Snipts, you’ll need to upgrade to the paid plan.

That’s a very good decision. You don’t lose anything that you’ve stored with them, you don’t need to save everything before it’s deleted… Other companies should have a look and learn something…

But what made my day was this part:

Can you suggest an alternative to Snipt?

Gist is an excellent alternative to Snipt.

For me, this is the sign that this company wants what’s best for its users. It’s not only about the money, it’s about allowing users to get the best service for what they’re ready to pay. “We could say that no free service is any good, but we won’t. We’re moving to paying accounts, but if you don’t want to, you can use this other good service.”

Thank you Snipt!

Photo: Customer, by 10ch via Flickr (CC BY)

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Core switch

DynDNS and No-IP

For a few years now, I’ve been using a DynDNS free account to access my personal server (at home), even though I have a dynamic IP address. This means that I’ve had a URL that would always point to my server, even when my IP would change.

But yesterday I’ve received an email from DynDNS:

For the last 15 years, all of us at Dyn have taken pride in offering you and millions of others a free version of our Dynamic DNS Pro product. What was originally a product built for a small group of users has blossomed into an exciting technology used around the world.
That is why with mixed emotions we are notifying you that in 30 days, we will be ending our free hostname program. This change in the business will allow us to invest in our customer support teams, Internet infrastructure, and platform security so that we can continue to strive to deliver an exceptional customer experience for our paying customers.
We would like to invite you to upgrade to VIP status for a 25% discounted rate, good for any package of Remote Access (formerly DynDNS Pro). By doing so, you’ll have access to customer support, additional hostnames, and more.

I’ve always been very happy with the service I’ve received from DynDNS, since I had a free account, and the only action required from me was to click on a link they sent me every month (I think) to keep my account active. But I don’t need this enough to pay for it.

So I’ve looked for a replacement for DynDNS, and I’ve found No-IP. It’s a very similar service, that has a free plan, and allows you to register up to 3 hosts. The inscription process is self-explanatory, and lets you register 1 host.

After registering (and validating your account), you need to install an update client on your host, which will regularly (by default every 30 minutes) contact the No-IP servers to update your mapping IP / URL. This way, your URL will always point to your host, with a maximum delay of 30 minutes (don’t use a free account if you need a good QOS with no or little “downtime”). The installation process of the client is very well explained on the knowledge base of No-IP: How to Install the Dynamic Update Client on Linux.

I’m now the proud owner of the URL http://remyg.no-ip.biz/, which allows me to access my personal server via SSH (or HTTP if I decide to use it to test my web projects). The total time spent for the registration, installation and configuration was less than 20 minutes, which shows how easy and well-explained the process is.

Photo: Core switch, by Seeweb via Flickr (CC BY-SA)

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